Games

Displaying 91-100 of 15806 results.
PC
Release Date: November 10, 1998   |   Genre: Action
3-D Ultra NASCAR Pinball is, as the name suggests, a pinball game with a racing theme. Unique is that the theme is not only present on the table's background images but that the player actually takes the role of one of four real-life NASCAR drivers. Every race consists of three parts, each represented by one table: preparing, racing and pit stops.
PC
Release Date: January 1, 1995   |   Genre: Action
The original 3-D Ultra Pinball game was released in 1995. This game is based on the space simulation game, Outpost. There are three tables named Colony, Command Post, and Mine. Each table holds a set of five challenges. Smaller "mini-tables" are featured with their own set of flippers. The goal is to build and launch a Starship completing the game's entire course.
PC
Release Date: January 1, 1996   |   Genre: Action
Pinball with a strong horror motif. In the 3-D Ultra Pinball tradition, many of the effects achieved on these tables could not be reproduced on traditional machines. There are even cutaways to mini-video games where you can rack up bonus points. Tables can be played individually, or all at once in a campaign to beat them.
PC
Release Date: January 1, 1997   |   Genre: Action
Lost Continent(1997) had a Jurassic Park-like set. It followed a storyline, in which a plane falls on an island where an evil genius, Heckla, has created dinosaurs of other animals and the cavemen who live there. Professor Spector, his assistant Mary, and adventurer Rex Hunter try to escape back to the modern world, rescue Neeka (a tribal woman), and stop Heckla and his army of robots. It has no challenges, but features 16 tables, divided in 3 "sectors": Jungle, Temple and Chambers (Heckla's Lab).
PC
Release Date: January 1, 1999   |   Genre: Action
Imagine a pinball machine emulating a full amusement park, and not just any park, but Hersheypark in Hershey, Pennsylvania, "The sweetest place on Earth!"(tm)! Over 15 action-packed "rides", plenty of special events include "lights out" fireworks show, double multi-ball event, side tables, multiple flipper sets, and more!
Nintendo Game Boy Color
Release Date: December 1, 2000   |   Genre: Action
Nintendo Entertainment System (NES)
Release Date: September 12, 1987   |   Genre: Shooter
3-D WorldRunner features many elements that are typical of a forward-scrolling rail shooter game, where the player focuses on destroying or dodging onscreen enemies against a scrolling background. 3-D WorldRunner incorporates a distinct third-person view, where the camera angle is positioned behind the main character. As WorldRunner, players make their way through eight worlds, battling hostile alien creatures and leaping over bottomless canyons. Each world is divided into different quadrants, and the player must pass through each quadrant before the time counter on the bottom of the game screen reaches zero. In each quadrant, the player can find pillar-like columns that house power-ups, objects that are beneficial or add extra abilities to the game character. At the end of each world's last quadrant is a serpent-like creature which must be defeated to advance. A status bar at the bottom of the screen displays the player's score, the time counter, the world number, the world quadrant, the number of bonus stars (items that increase the player's score count) collected by the player, and the number of lives, or continues, remaining.
Atari 2600
Release Date: January 1, 1988   |   Genre: Action
32 games in 1 cartridge was 1988 released and is highly common in Europe. Popular Atari 2600 games of the sports- and shootergenre was put into one cartridge. This was a cart that was released in PAL format in Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Most were the pack in game with the Atari 2600 in the UK and Atari 7800 in Australia and New Zealand but it was also released as a boxed separate game for the Atari 2600. A different game was selected every time the Atari 2600 or Atari 7800 was turned on.
Sega Saturn
Release Date: November 30, 1996   |   Genre: Sports
Crystal Dynamics presents the most realistic baseball video game ever published. Real Motion Control 3D technology serves up incredibly life-like 3D polygonal models that bit, pitch, and hit like real players.
PC
Release Date: June 1, 1991   |   Genre: Construction and Management Simulation
3D Construction Kit 2 (3DCK2) is a great sequel to Incentive/Domark's 3D Construction Kit, released a year earlier. As with the first title, 3DCK2 isn't really a game but a powerful application that lets you create 3D action/adventure games. The engine is powered by Freescape, Incentive's acclaimed game engine that anyone who has played '80s classics Castle Master or Driller, or any other Incentive game is familiar with. 3DCK2 allows you to create a 3D world by building objects, then positioning them accordingly. For example, a house can be made up of a cube with a pyramid-shaped roof. Add a door and windows, and you've got your own virtual bungalow. You can also inspect your work from any angle, at any time, by simply walking or flying around the area it's in. With enough time and patience, you can actually design an entire town, complete with the insides of every building. But a 3D game isn't a game if it's just a pastiche of different virtual environments, and here is what makes 3DCK2 much more superior than simple 3D applications. As in the first Kit, 3DCK2 lets you write the entire game using a special language which can be accessed on the Conditions menu. The language is similar to BASIC, but customized to 3D games. You can control things, enter doors, pick up objects, display messages, and write complicated routines and characteristics for each object to your heart's content. When you are done, you can then save your game with the compiler provided. This allows the game to function separately from the program so you can give copies to your friends. And it'll be just like a real Freescape game, with a plot, goals and missions, whatever you want - they won't be able to edit or alter anything. Overall, 3DCK2 improves upon the first release with many more options, a much more user-friendly interface, and most importantly, sharp 256-color VGA graphics. If you ever want to create your own 3D game, you'd be amazed at what this small 1992 application can do.